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February 22, 2017

BrainsGate technology is based on established scientific evidence that electrical stimulation of the Spheno-Palatine Ganglion (SPG) increases cerebral blood flow. 

 

The Spheno-Palatine Ganglion, also known as the Pterygopalatine ganglion, is a parasympathetic nerve center located behind the maxilary sinus next to the nasal cavity. There are two SPG centers, one at each side of the face. The SPG is a triangular shaped ganglion, 6 mm long that contains synapses for sensory, motor and autonomous nerve fibers. It is known that the SPG supplies the lacrimal and nasal glands. More recently, it was discovered that the SPG also innervates the anterior cerebral circulation in mammals (including humans), which formed the basis for BrainsGate breakthrough technology.

Electrical stimulation of the SPG induces cerebral vasodilatation (increases the diameter of blood vessels supplying the brain). Moderately dilating these blood vessels has been shown to increase blood flow to the brain, and release neurotransmitters such as NO (Nitric Oxide), ACH (Acetyl Choline) and VIP (Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide). This phenomenon has a broad range of potential applications and can be used for both acute or chronic indications, and at different intensities. An example for acute, mild stimulation is the case of acute ischemic stroke, where blood circulation has been compromised. SPG stimulation can increase perfusion to the areas suffering from reduced or lack of blood supply, and help save brain tissue. A different (more intense) stimulation regimen, either chronic or acute, can be used to induce a temporary, controlled increase in the permeability of the vessels' walls, thus enabling delivery of drugs, that otherwise would not permeate the Blood-Brain-Barrier.
July 16, 2014
ImpACT24 Interim Results
The Data Safety Monitoring Board (the "DSMB") for BrainsGate's study examined the interim results and deterimined the results support the continuation of the study > full story
January 1, 1970
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